Little known facts - Liz Myers and John Trivers

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Little known facts

Looked like a short trip on the map

Trivers was in a Canadian rock band in the 80’s called Prism.  One night after a show in Reno, Nevada, (opening for ZZ Top) he got on the tour bus and headed east.  Three days later, the band arrived in Bangor, Maine. Unfortunately, the show was cancelled due a snowstorm. (ZZ Top’s Lear jet couldn’t land in the blizzard.)  The band got back on the bus and went to the next gig in Binghamton N.Y.

You hold it this way

Almost thirty years ago, on a film shoot location, Steve Jobs showed director Adrian Lyne, creative director Lee Clow, producer Richard O’Neill, actor Kevin Costner, and music director John Trivers how to use a small plastic device called a “mouse.”  John was working as the Music Director for Chiat Day Advertising to produce the music for the next generation of personal computers.  The date was 1984.

If at first you don’t succeed…

John was hired by Richard O’Neill (Executive Producer/TBWA-ChiatDay Advertising) to oversee the music for the new Apple Computer launch.  Originally the first computer that Apple created was called the “Lisa”, (so named after Steve Job’s daughter).  But the Lisa didn’t take hold the way the next computer did:  the Macintosh.  On the Super Bowl that year a :60-second commercial ran once in the third quarter to announce that “1984 won’t be like 1984”.  In the commercial Big Brother announces “We shall prevail.”

Call the doctor

In 1983, Liz Myers was flown up to Oakland to work as a “lyric doctor” for Bay area artist Eddie Money, on his “No Control” album, produced by rock and roll icon producer Tom Dowd.  She stayed in a small motel and worked on lyrics all day.  One of the songs from that collaboration, “Shakin’” has been played over a million times on the radio.  It was recently covered by the girl punk band “Winelord” on Bloat Records.  Click here to purchase.

From no control to total control

Trivers, a bass player, played on one of the biggest records of the ‘80s:  We are the World. The artist was Tina Turner and the song “Total Control.” Click here to purchase.

What makes a hit?

Trivers was called to play bass on a Broadway musical that was opening in 1974. It was called “Soon” and starred Richard Gere and Peter Allen, both in the early part of their careers.  That show opened and closed in one day. The next month Trivers was called for another musical just opening. It had a script and songs by first time writers, and a cast of unknowns. That show was called “Grease” and it still runs to this day somewhere in the world.

Not his best take

When Trivers and Myers recorded the musical theme for the CBS Evening News, the session took place at the Fox sound stage and was engineered by Allen Sides.  The music took six hours to perform. It was on the air for nineteen years and the musicians were paid residuals for that entire time.  Years later, when TM listened to the master tape, it was discovered that the oboe player didn’t play a note on the one take that was chosen as the master. For him, silence was truly golden.

2008 Olympics commercial

United wanted to use the dynamic duo of Lang Lang and Herbie Hancock in a two piano performance of Rhapsody in Blue.  But Trivers and Myers wanted the film to be scored, a dramatic love story animated by Jamie Caliri.  So they wrote an original piece of music to introduce the “love theme” from Rhapsody.  At Capitol Records, on April 19, 2008 the session took place and United made a film of it. Visit Youtube to view the results.

2010 diapers go viral

When Pampers wanted to show off the Olympic quality of their diapers, they took a piece from Trivers Myers’ library to help show off their wares. Parents sent in home video of their babies scooting across the floor in various Olympic-style moves. Click here to see the kids and their relay races.